Best Trout Spinners in Georgia

There are many great trout lures and baits. This article will have a quick look at the most popular, and best trout lures fishermen use to catch trout, both wild and stock in the rivers and streams across Georgia.

We will only look at hard lures, not soft plastic or rubbery trout lures or flies. While there is no doubting their effective, there is something reassuring about the purity of targeting trout on metal spinners.

So let’s jump straight in and discuss Georgia’s most popular trout lures.

1) Inline Spinners

By far, the most popular trout lures in Georgia are inline spinners. Out of the multitude of brands, two get cast into, and retrieved across Georgia waters more than any other. These are the nationally popular Panther Martin and none other than the dependable Rooster tail.

In bigger rivers, such as the Toccoa, Chattahoochee and the Chattooga river most fishermen choose to fish slightly heavier sizes 1/8 to 1/4 models. These sink faster, cast further and give off a greater flash to gain trout’s attention in deeper pools and runs.

Picking the correct color can challenge even the most experience fisherman. Luckily, there are some general rules. The all time classic silver or gold blades are always a good starting point. If the water is a bit cloudy, then go for brighter, bolder colors. I like red, but other popular options are Yellow with red dots and black body with yellow dots.

When the water is clear, go for more subdue, natural colors. Most importantly, bring a selection and fish them with confidence. If you are having no success, then consider changing colors before brands of styles.

Different tactics are a requirement to bring success in the smaller streams and creeks in the state’s north. First, the smaller shallower water requires lighter lures, somewhere between 1/32- to 1/8-oz

works well. These lighter lures are not only easier to keep off the stream floor, they also do a better job representing the smaller natural prey found in the streams.

For a comprehensive guide on how to fish inline spinners click here.


2) Spoons

There are so many great spoons on the market, and most of them get fished in Georgia. The most popular brands include Little Cleo, Kastmaster, Super Duper, Phoebe and Johnson. Like with inline spinners above, select the size to suit the river or stream you plan on fishing.

Heavier lures 1/4 to 1/8oz for large rivers such as the Chattahoochee, and drop down a size or two when targeting stream trout. The 1/8oz lures are a safe middle ground, and can be fished with success in most waters.

When targeting stock trout, it is also generally better to fish lighter rather than heavier lures. That is because they are use to feeding on small fish pellets. A 1/4oz lure might just cause them to scatter. A few fishermen even have success with spoons as light as 1/32oz.

3) Jerkbaits

Rapala original floating jerkbaits are a great option for targeting wild brown trout. They are among the most lifelike of all hard body trout lures so its not surprising that they can trick, otherwise timid wild trout.

Big brown trout frequently feed upon the natural prey species, these mostly include small stocked rainbows, yellow perch and even crayfish. Jerkbait do a great job at representing most of these. Select colors and patterns to look as close as possible to the prey species. So it should come at little surprise that the most productive patterns are Rainbow trout and yellow perch.

In the smaller streams, brook trout patterns work well where the two species coexist.

When the water clarity is poor, change to even brighter colors. Bright orange, and red work well. I like the fire tiger pattern.

There are many brands of jerkbaits on the market, but most Georgia anglers choose to fish Rapalas. Either the original floater or countdown variations in sizes 5 to 9. The bigger the water, the bigger the lure.

For a comprehensive guide on how to fish Rapalas and Jerkbaits click here.

For advice on where to fish in Georgia, check our guide here.

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